Women in the Military

full screen
Training

Training

TFA-R32006-008-03, Cpl Shawnna Murphy a RMS Clerk from 36 CBG HQ, Halifax, NS originally from CornerBrook, NL, packs the radio during navigation and communications exercises. Cpl Murphy is a members of Task Force Afghanistan-Roto 3 (TFA-R3) and is going through refresher training on various subjects during Individual Battlefield Training Standard (IBTS) training conducted by Land Forces Atlantic Area (LFAA) Training Centre at CFB Gagetown. Image by: Sgt Craig Fiander, TFA-R3 Public Affairs Image. Date: 15 Sep 2006
military_woman_canada_army_000002

military_woman_canada_army_000002

military_woman_canada_army_000003

military_woman_canada_army_000003

military_woman_canada_army_000004

military_woman_canada_army_000004

military_woman_canada_army_000005

military_woman_canada_army_000005

English/Anglais
iv-2004-4355
July 21, 2004
Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Ordinary Seaman Rochelle Hewlett enjoys the refreshing rainfall as she finishes day 2 of the Nijmegen Marches.
The Nijmegen Marches, held annually in the Netherlands, is a prestigious international event in which the Canadian Forces (CF) has participated since 1952.  This year, the event takes place between 20-23 July and marks the 52nd time the CF has participated. Contingent commander Brigadier-General Ray Romses leads the 220-strong CF contingent. CF participation in the marches combines an important test of physical fitness and teamwork with an opportunity to commemorate Canadian participation in the liberation of the Netherlands in 1944. 
The military participants must complete over 160 km in four days, while carrying a standard military rucksack weighing at least 10 kg.  Now the world’s largest walking event and one of the world’s largest sporting events, the Nijmegen Marches attracts both civilians and soldiers, participating in teams or as individuals. The event draws more than 40,000 marchers from 50 different nations and is witnessed by over one million spectators along the 160 km route. 
Photo Sgt David Snashall 

French/Français
iv-2004-4355
Le 21 juillet 2004
Nimègue (Pays﷓Bas)

Le Matelot de 3e classe Rochelle Hewlett accueille à bras ouvert la pluie rafraîchissante à la fin de la deuxième journée de la marche de Nimègue.
Depuis 1952, les Forces canadiennes (FC) prennent part à la marche annuelle de Nimègue, aux Pays﷓Bas, qui constitue une activité internationale de prestige. Cette année, qui marque le 52e anniversaire de participation des FC, la marche a lieu du 20 au 23 juillet, et c’est le Brigadier﷓général Ray Romses qui commande le contingent de 220 membres des FC. La marche met à l’épreuve l’endurance physique ainsi que l’esprit d’équipe des participants tout en leur permettant de commémorer la contribution des Canadiens à la libération des Pays﷓Bas en 1944. 
Les marcheurs militaires doivent parcourir 160 km à pied en quatre jours, chargés d’un sac à dos militaire d’au moins 10 kg. Outre son titre de marche la plus importante au monde, la marche de Nimègue compte aussi parmi les événements sportifs de grande envergure et attire chaque année plus de 40 000 participants militaires et civils provenant de 50 pays. Ces participants s’inscrivent individuellement ou en équipe et plus d’un million de spectateurs, disséminés le long des 160 km, assistent à cette activité.

Photo : Sgt David Snashall

English/Anglais iv-2004-4355 July 21, 2004 Nijmegen, the Netherlands Ordinary Seaman Rochelle Hewlett enjoys the refreshing rainfall as she finishes day 2 of the Nijmegen Marches. The Nijmegen Marches, held annually in the Netherlands, is a prestigious international event in which the Canadian Forces (CF) has participated since 1952. This year, the event takes place between 20-23 July and marks the 52nd time the CF has participated. Contingent commander Brigadier-General Ray Romses leads the 220-strong CF contingent. CF participation in the marches combines an important test of physical fitness and teamwork with an opportunity to commemorate Canadian participation in the liberation of the Netherlands in 1944. The military participants must complete over 160 km in four days, while carrying a standard military rucksack weighing at least 10 kg. Now the world’s largest walking event and one of the world’s largest sporting events, the Nijmegen Marches attracts both civilians and soldiers, participating in teams or as individuals. The event draws more than 40,000 marchers from 50 different nations and is witnessed by over one million spectators along the 160 km route. Photo Sgt David Snashall French/Français iv-2004-4355 Le 21 juillet 2004 Nimègue (Pays﷓Bas) Le Matelot de 3e classe Rochelle Hewlett accueille à bras ouvert la pluie rafraîchissante à la fin de la deuxième journée de la marche de Nimègue. Depuis 1952, les Forces canadiennes (FC) prennent part à la marche annuelle de Nimègue, aux Pays﷓Bas, qui constitue une activité internationale de prestige. Cette année, qui marque le 52e anniversaire de participation des FC, la marche a lieu du 20 au 23 juillet, et c’est le Brigadier﷓général Ray Romses qui commande le contingent de 220 membres des FC. La marche met à l’épreuve l’endurance physique ainsi que l’esprit d’équipe des participants tout en leur permettant de commémorer la contribution des Canadiens à la libération des Pays﷓Bas en 1944. Les marcheurs militaires doivent parcourir 160 km à pied en quatre jours, chargés d’un sac à dos militaire d’au moins 10 kg. Outre son titre de marche la plus importante au monde, la marche de Nimègue compte aussi parmi les événements sportifs de grande envergure et attire chaque année plus de 40 000 participants militaires et civils provenant de 50 pays. Ces participants s’inscrivent individuellement ou en équipe et plus d’un million de spectateurs, disséminés le long des 160 km, assistent à cette activité. Photo : Sgt David Snashall

military_woman_canada_army_000007

military_woman_canada_army_000007

military_woman_canada_army_000008

military_woman_canada_army_000008

military_woman_canada_army_000009

military_woman_canada_army_000009

Exercise Charging Bison 06

Exercise Charging Bison 06

English/Anglais
LG2006-0416d
5 May 2006
Winnipeg, Mb
Winnipeg - Private Shanna Funk grimaces in pain from the highly annoying high-pitched squeal coming from her activated Multiple Intergrated Laser Engagement System. Pte Funk is with the Forward Support Group. Pte Funk is with 16 (Saskatchewan) Service Battalion.

Soldiers from 38 Canadian Brigade are training in Winnipeg on Exercise Charging Bison 06 from 30 April to 6 May. The purpose of Exercise Charging Bison 06 is to expose 38 CBG soldiers to the intricacies of conducting operations in an urban environment such as they may encounter if they are deployed on operations outside of Canada. Specifically, 38 CBG needs to train its soldiers on how to interact with a local civilian population while, at the same time, remaining focused on a military mission.

38 CBG consists of Reserve soldiers from Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Northern Ontario. Approximately 630 soldiers from 38 CBG, 4th Canadian Ranger Patrol Group from Northern Manitoba and Minnesota National Guard soldiers from 14 Infantry Division also took part in Exercise Charging Bison.

Photo: Cpl Bill Gomm

Français/French
LG2006-0416d
Le 5 mai 2006
Winnipeg (Manitoba)
Winnipeg – Le Soldat Shanna Funk grimace de douleur en entendant le son strident qu’émet son système intégré d'engagement multiple au laser activé. Le Sdt Funk fait partie du groupe de soutien avancé. Le Sdt Funk est membre du 16e Bataillon des services (Saskatchewan).

Des soldats du 38e Groupe-brigade du Canada s’entraînent à Winnipeg dans le cadre de l’exercice Charging Bison 2006, du 30 avril au 6 mai. Le but de l’exercice Charging Bison 2006 est de sensibiliser les soldats du 38 GBC au déroulement des opérations en zone urbaine comme celles qu’ils peuvent auxquelles ils risquent d’être exposés s’ils sont déployés à l’étranger. Plus précisément, le 38 GBC doit enseigner aux soldats comment interagir avec les populations locales civiles tout restant concentrés sur la mission militaire.

Le 38 GBC est formé de réservistes de la Saskatchewan, du Manitoba et du Nord de l’Ontario. Quelque 630 soldats du 38 GBC, du 4e Groupe de patrouilles des Rangers canadiens du Nord du Manitoba et des soldats de la Minnesota National Guard de la 14e Division d’infanterie ont aussi pris part à l’exercice Charging Bison.

Photo : Cpl Bill Gomm

military_woman_canada_army_000011

military_woman_canada_army_000011

Ex Rapid Bear

Ex Rapid Bear

IS2002-6522a

August 26, 2002

Petawawa, Ontario

Private Laurel Lawrence of Head Quarters and Signals Regiment, man's the sentry trench at the entrance to the command post complex during the Exercise Rapid Bear in Petawawa. The exercise was held to validate the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment for Rapid Response Unit responsibilities. Photo:MCpl Paul MacGregor Canadian Forces Combat Camera
FRENCH/FRANÇAIS
IS2002-6522a

26 août 2002

Petawawa (Ontario)

Le Soldat Laurel Lawrence du Quartier général et escadron de transmissions, monte la garde dans la tranchée de la sentinelle, à l’entrée du poste de commandement pendant l’exercice Rapid Bear, à Petawawa. Cet exercice visait à vérifier la capacité du 3e bataillon du Royal Canadian Regiment d’assumer les responsabilités d’unité d’intervention rapide. Une UIR doit maintenir un état de préparation élevé pendant une période fixe ou jusqu’à ce qu’elle soit appelée en service par la chaîne de commandement. Une UIR devrait être en mesure de se déployer de 30 à 90 jours après avoir reçu un ordre d’avertissement. L’UIR peut être appelée à participer à des opérations de combat décisives, à des missions d’exploitation de lieux sensibles et d’aide humanitaire.
Photo: Cplc Paul MacGregor – Caméra de combat des Forces canadiennes
military_woman_canada_army_000013

military_woman_canada_army_000013

military_woman_canada_army_000014

military_woman_canada_army_000014

military_woman_canada_army_000015

military_woman_canada_army_000015

military_woman_canada_army_000016

military_woman_canada_army_000016

military_woman_canada_army_000017

military_woman_canada_army_000017

military_woman_canada_army_000018

military_woman_canada_army_000018

military_woman_canada_army_000019

military_woman_canada_army_000019

military_woman_canada_army_000020

military_woman_canada_army_000020

AFGHANISTAN-CANADA-EASTER

AFGHANISTAN-CANADA-EASTER

Canadian soldiers with the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) display Easter Eggs during easter celebrations at the Kandahar air base on March 23, 2008. Canada has 2,500 troops in the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), most of them in Kandahar province, one of the worst areas hit by unrest linked to an insurgency led by the extremist Taliban movement. AFP PHOTO/SHAH Marai (Photo credit should read SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images)
AR2010-0039-08

01 March 2010

Kandahar, Afghanistan

Princess Anne visits with deployed Canadian Forces members during her 2-day visit to Afghanistan. The Princess met with members of the Communications and Electronics branch, Canadian Forces Medical Services and the Royal Newfoundland Regiment during her visit. She is the honorary Colonel-in-Chief of all three branches.

Joint Task Force Afghanistan (JTF-Afg) is the Canadian Forces (CF) contribution to the international effort in Afghanistan. Its operations focus on working with Afghan authorities to improve security, governance and economic development in Afghanistan. JTF-Afg comprises more than 2,750 CF members.

Master Corporal Matthew McGregor, Image Tech, JTFK Afghanistan, Roto 8

AR2010-0039-08 01 March 2010 Kandahar, Afghanistan Princess Anne visits with deployed Canadian Forces members during her 2-day visit to Afghanistan. The Princess met with members of the Communications and Electronics branch, Canadian Forces Medical Services and the Royal Newfoundland Regiment during her visit. She is the honorary Colonel-in-Chief of all three branches. Joint Task Force Afghanistan (JTF-Afg) is the Canadian Forces (CF) contribution to the international effort in Afghanistan. Its operations focus on working with Afghan authorities to improve security, governance and economic development in Afghanistan. JTF-Afg comprises more than 2,750 CF members. Master Corporal Matthew McGregor, Image Tech, JTFK Afghanistan, Roto 8

PUBLIC RELATIONS

PUBLIC RELATIONS

military_woman_canada_army_000024

military_woman_canada_army_000024